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What is a power of attorney?

The responsibilities of a fiduciary acting as an Agent under Power of Attorney include the following: For health care, the fiduciary acts as attorney-in-fact to make health-care decisions, including placement, medical, treatment and final burial arrangements. More recently an Advance Health Care Directive (AHCD) provides this guidance.  However, one also needs to include a HIPAA agreement for their agent to have access to medical records as some medical professionals will not honor the AHCD alone. For financial matters, the fiduciary conducts personal and financial business pursuant to the client’s written instructions.

When should I (or my parent) appoint you as power of attorney?

Before cognitive issues develop, including dementia or Alzheimer's because Powers of Attorney cannot be signed if a person lacks capacity. If the latter applies, then mom or dad will need to be conserved (conservatorship).

Estate or Trust Administration

A trustee will manage investments, keep records, manage assets, prepare court accountings, pay bills (depending on the nature of the trust) medical expenses, charitable gifts, inheritances or other distributions of income and principal. Trustees are not required to exercise all of the powers that they are granted.[2] A trustee can manage any number of trust types, including Charitable, Special Needs Trusts, ILIT, Corporate, and Estate Trusts.

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Conservator / Committee

The term conservatorship is synonymous with elderly guardian but used mostly in the western United States. It is a court-appointed process that can be very expensive as the petitioners and proposed conservatee all must be represented by attorneys, with just a few exceptions for in pro per family members without objections. The reason for the expense is that the proposed conservatee's estate is expected to bear the burden of the court costs in the procedures to appoint.
 

Powers of Attorney

Under common law, a power of attorney becomes ineffective if its grantor dies or becomes "incapacitated," meaning unable to grant such a power, because of physical injury or mental illness, for example, unless the grantor (or principal) specifies that the power of attorney will continue to be effective even if the grantor becomes incapacitated. This type of power of attorney is called "power of attorney with durable provisions" in the United States or "enduring power of attorney" elsewhere. In effect, under a durable power of attorney (DPoA) [1] Read more

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